Southwest engine went boom

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J
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Re: Southwest engine went boom

Postby J » Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:49 am

To add to my previous post of the ATC recording on the previous page, here are more details including photo of fatally-injured woman.

Excerpt:

PHILADELPHIA -- Federal investigators said Wednesday an engine crack caused a deadly blow-out on a Southwest Airlines jet. CBS News has also learned the woman who was nearly sucked out of the plane's broken window Tuesday was wearing a seatbelt.

Philadelphia's medical examiner said Wednesday that Jennifer Riordan died of blunt impact trauma to her head, neck and torso.

Spokesman James Garrow of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health said Wednesday evening that Riordan's death was ruled accidental.
* * *
When the window burst, 43-year-old Jennifer Riordan, a married mother of two from New Mexico, was partially sucked out of the plane. Fellow passengers pulled her back in and unsuccessfully attempted CPR.

She is the first passenger on a U.S. airliner to die in an accident since 2009.
* * *
"A piece of the engine's cover was ripped off, coming down 75 miles from the Philadelphia Airport," said NTSB chair and former 737 pilot Robert Sumwalt.

Southwest says the 18-year-old Boeing 737 was inspected just three days before the accident. The NTSB will review its maintenance history.

Southwest flies more than 700 737's with an average age of just under 11 years, but it is not uncommon for airliners to fly for 20 years or more.

Passengers are calling Captain Tammie Jo Shults a hero for safely landing the plane. Shults, who one passenger said had nerves of steel, was one of the first women to become a Navy fighter pilot.


https://www.cbsnews.com/news/southwest- ... picks=true

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Not_Karl
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Re: Southwest engine went boom

Postby Not_Karl » Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:03 am

AvHerald now has a picture of the damaged fan.
Not_Karl: ***2) Ban all CFM-56 turbine engines?***
Not_Fixed as much as asked.
AvieHeraldie:
EASA had released Airworthiness Directive 2018-0071 dated Mar 26th 2018 and effective Apr 2nd 2018 reasoning: "An occurrence was reported of fan blade failure on a CFM56-7B engine. The released fan blade was initially contained by the engine case, but there was subsequent uncontained forward release of debris and separation of the inlet cowl. Preliminary investigation determined that the fracture in the blade initiated from the fan blade dovetail. This condition, if not detected and corrected, could lead to fan blade failure, possibly resulting in uncontained forward release of debris, with consequent damage to the engine and the aeroplane." The AD requires an ultrasonic inspection of each affected fan blade within 9 months of the AD becoming effective.

The FAA had released an AD 2010-12-03 for CFM56-3 and CFM56-3B engines not applicable to this aircraft which features CFM56-7B engines. The FAA AD and EAD register shows no other airworthiness directives concerning fan blades of CFM56 engines.
Junior Janitor, Vandelay Industries, Inc., Environmental Poisoning Assurance department.

"I think, based on the types of aircraft listed, you're pretty much guaranteed a fiery death."
- Contemporary Poet flyboy2548m to a Foffie.

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3WE
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Re: Southwest engine went boom

Postby 3WE » Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:26 pm

Here is the obligatory cockpit crew bashing post: Sounds like they 1. simply followed engine failure/fire procedures and 2. continued to fly the plane. To heck with the embellished headlines. As to whether they did 2 based on fundamental rules or because it was on an Evan check list, who knows.
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3WE
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Here vs. There.

Postby 3WE » Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:55 pm

Big Gabbie and Evanie discussion:

It looks like the crew did not_do the all out ultimate maximum performance death dive to 10,000 feet. (10,001 feet- passengers out cold...10,000 feet they all jolt awake gasping for air).

3BS Comments- Indeed, it kind of looks like they descended expeditiously but perhaps cautiously.

3BS Opinion- I find that mildly interesting, but parlour-talk-ass-ume that maybe they wanted to avoid Vunknownbutfastspeedwherebustedcrapgetsrippedoff
And Bobbieeee seems to be having flare ups with male menopause.
Commercial Pilot, Vandelay Industries, Inc., Plant Nutrient Division.

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Rabbi O'Genius
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Re: Here vs. There.

Postby Rabbi O'Genius » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:07 pm

....... maybe they wanted to avoid Vunknownbutfastspeedwherebustedcrapgetsrippedoff
Indeed
The relatively low risk of asphyxiating a few, Vs. The undetermined risk of cremating the full complement.
......never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee. – John Donne

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Rabbi O'Genius
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Re: Southwest engine went boom

Postby Rabbi O'Genius » Sat Apr 21, 2018 3:44 am

FAA Directive issued to inspect 681 CFM56-7B engines in the next 20 days.

https://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=90125
......never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee. – John Donne

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Gabriel
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Re: Here vs. There.

Postby Gabriel » Sat Apr 21, 2018 8:32 am

Big Gabbie and Evanie discussion:

It looks like the crew did not_do the all out ultimate maximum performance death dive to 10,000 feet. (10,001 feet- passengers out cold...10,000 feet they all jolt awake gasping for air).

3BS Comments- Indeed, it kind of looks like they descended expeditiously but perhaps cautiously.

3BS Opinion- I find that mildly interesting, but parlour-talk-ass-ume that maybe they wanted to avoid Vunknownbutfastspeedwherebustedcrapgetsrippedoff
And Bobbieeee seems to be having flare ups with male menopause.
Mine was a factual observation, not a discussion. They did not do a particularly rapid descent, they did not declare emergency (with the E or the M words at least, they did not report depressurization, and the depressurization happened very early in the sequence of events: you can hear the cabin altitude warning before the first com where the captain reports that they are single engine and descending. All that is factual.

If you want my opinion:
The crew did a great job. Perfect? Maybe not in the details, but yes in the things that matter. Dealing with a severe engine damage + engine fire (at least indication of such) + rapid depressurization + structural damage (hole in the fuselage) + injuries pax + an commanded roll of more than 41 degrees + airframe vibrations + uncertainty abut the condition and controlability of the plane (that lead them to decide to land with flaps 5 to keep the speed up with better control authority) on top of the regular flying is not a mundane task. I resist to call them "heroes" , what they did is not out of this world or anything like that, but they did their job very well in what was likely a very high workload and stressful conditions and they did the aviate and navigate part great, with some minor and inconsequential flaws in the communicate. With limited resources and capacity to multitask, they put the focus in what mattered most.

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flyboy2548m
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Re: Here vs. There.

Postby flyboy2548m » Sat Apr 21, 2018 3:17 pm


If you want my opinion:
Nope.
"Lav sinks on 737 Max are too small"

-TeeVee, one of America's finest legal minds.

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3WE
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Re: Southwest engine went boom

Postby 3WE » Sun May 13, 2018 12:58 pm

<Evan>
<The CVR> "We have an engine failure, that's it.
Indeed, I find this mildly curious and look forward to the timeline in the final report.

Nevertheless, my parlour speculation is it all happened in a rather quick sequence, and the crew simply didn't think to say they had a pressurization problem.

As I stated there, they should be subjected to public, physical punishment for this transgression of procedure.

That is all.
Commercial Pilot, Vandelay Industries, Inc., Plant Nutrient Division.

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3WE
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WN- No Fly List

Postby 3WE » Tue May 15, 2018 4:28 pm

Yahoo says the puke-orange- and puke-blue-liveried airline made a THIRD precautionary landing due to pressurization problems. (No spectacular window events on this one).

Ban Southwest!

Footnote: I forgot to do a flight report- Rode them two weeks ago...friends joked to stay away from the windows.

I didn't died.
Commercial Pilot, Vandelay Industries, Inc., Plant Nutrient Division.

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Not_Karl
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Re: WN- No Fly List

Postby Not_Karl » Wed May 16, 2018 5:42 pm

Footnote: I forgot to do a flight report- Rode them two weeks ago...friends joked to stay away from the windows.

I didn't died.
No shimmy damper issues?
Junior Janitor, Vandelay Industries, Inc., Environmental Poisoning Assurance department.

"I think, based on the types of aircraft listed, you're pretty much guaranteed a fiery death."
- Contemporary Poet flyboy2548m to a Foffie.

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3WE
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Re: WN- No Fly List

Postby 3WE » Sat May 19, 2018 2:01 am

Footnote: I forgot to do a flight report- Rode them two weeks ago...friends joked to stay away from the windows.

I didn't died.
No shimmy damper issues?
Correct.

Nor tyre failures (Young MS 3BS).
Nor diversions, go arounds, nor an engine detachment on the same route 1 week AFTER riding the plane (as happened with Grandma 3BS in the 1970s on a 707).

Nor brief exhaust valve stickage (3BS in a 150 taking an instrument lesson). The plane did died a couple months later.
Commercial Pilot, Vandelay Industries, Inc., Plant Nutrient Division.


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